Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Delta Gamma sister remembered for legacy on the slopes

Jayne “Jane” Livingston Bergman: Loyalty

“Loyalty to her friends,” a trait of a special Delta Gamma that is missed by an entire community of 1,000+ people. This is the description given of the late Jayne Livingston Bergman, Tau-Iowa, of Keystone, Colorado by her friend of 20 years, Joyce Hanna Clary, Alpha Nu-USC. From the time the two met and discovered they were both DGs, the friendship and support of each other endured.

As a collegian Jane was a leader in the chapter and the student body at University of Iowa, but it was her willing support of an endeavor that she and her husband, Bill, agreed to with another couple on New Year’s Eve 1968 when she exemplified what it meant to “Do Good” in a big way. Jane and Bill agreed to help build a new ski resort in Summit County with noted skier Max Dercum and his wife Edna. Max, who created his first ski area at Arapahoe Basin in 1946, would take care of the snow operations and ski school, while the Bergmans would handle the business side, finding investors and building first the ski facility, then the entire Keystone resort community. 

Originally hailing from Iowa, the couple who met at a college pub when Bill offered to teach her how to play pinball, quickly sprang into action and started contacting friends in Cedar Falls, where they lived. 

He is credited with transforming the ski industry into a corporate enterprise by getting Ralston-Purina to invest in Keystone. And right by his side was Jane teasing him and urging him on. Her son, Bill Jr., calls his mother the resort’s first marketing director.

In 2013 the Bergman’s’ co-authored a book, By Chance: The Founding of Keystone Resort. In it Jane is quoted, “When I wake up every morning and interact with the people who are here, it’s very grounding, and it centers me into staying in touch with the parts of life that are most important.” Very good advice no matter where you live. She was passionate about the community she helped create and enjoyed talking and greeting visitors to the resort or creating camaraderie with other Keystone residents.

Jane Bergman, a strong leader, an athlete, a compassionate DG, loyal to her family and husband, loyal to her friends, loyal to her Keystone community, passed away as she was being carried by a Flight for Life helicopter over “her mountain” as a blue moon rose in the sky above her on September 27. We are proud of the example Jane has been for women of all ages - for her life of giving and her membership in Delta Gamma Fraternity for 91 years. 

Written by Marilyn Haas, Alpha Rho-Ohio Wesleyan, Fraternity Archivist 

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Life: A Series of Choices

Picture this: It’s 3:52 p.m. on Monday, November 2, 2015 and you are sitting in the office of the dean of students. You have a 4 p.m. meeting with her and the director of student conduct. In the past 36 hours, you have heard from almost everyone you know and apologized more times than you can count. When will this nightmare stop? You take a deep breath and begin to recount the ripple effects of the choice you made on Saturday morning: 

Last hour | Monday, November 2, 2015
A note was tucked under your wind shield wiper. The note only contained one word: Bigot.

9:17 a.m. | Monday, November 2, 2015
You received a call from your favorite professor. Professor Barker is concerned about you representing the college ambassador organization next month in light of the recent events. It’s best for you to sit out this opportunity. 

7:04 a.m. | Monday, November 2, 2015
It was the lead story on more than one national morning show. There was your face, in that costume, with the university’s name and Delta Gamma’s name scrolling across the bottom. It was horrible. 

8 p.m. | Sunday, November 1, 2015
Television station crews were parked outside the location of the chapter meeting. You had planned to honor your big sister with her homecoming court announcement.  

12:18 p.m. | Sunday, November 1, 2015
You received an email from your adviser letting you know the Regional Collegiate Specialist will be reaching out to discuss the situation.

11 a.m. | Sunday, November 1, 2015
You called your parents. You explained your social media accounts are private. You don’t know how this picture got out. Your parents cried with you and asked you to explain what you were thinking. 

8:37 a.m. | Sunday, November 1, 2015
You woke up to text messages from friends whose parents saw a photo from Saturday night on the local news. You didn’t take that many photos. You have no idea how a photo made it on to the news.

9 p.m. | Saturday, October 31, 2015
You loaded the bus with your date. A sister asked you if you thought your costume was inappropriate. You ignored her. 

10:04 a.m. | Saturday, October 31, 2015
You woke up and thought of the costume idea for the party. You hopped online and found some pictures for inspiration. 

3:45 p.m. | Friday, October 30, 2015
You received a text from your roommate about costume ideas. You replied, “Want to come up with something funny?”

Imagine this: It never happened. Breathe a sigh of relief. You realized that your “funny attempt” could hurt, would be off-putting and was far from humorous. You are not embarrassed. You’re not crying, nor are you hesitant to answer a call or go to your car. You didn’t offend anyone or upset the cultures represented within your community and our sisterhood. You remain the champion you promised to be, and a kind, caring student within your campus.  

Live this: “There is a choice you have to make, in everything you do. And, you must always keep in mind, the choice you make, makes you.” Thank you, Anonymous – you always say the right thing. 
Pause. Consider the possible ripple effects of your choices. Ask yourself, “Is this supportive of others? Would I want a picture of this to serve as my profile photo? Am I showing that I care about my neighbor, or that I hate them? Is this choice the best me?” 
Save yourself and those around you by considering the possibilities. Even the possibilities you think could never happen. At all times, but especially as we enter a seasonal time of dressing up in costume, consider how your Saturday morning version of funny will offend, will hurt and will not show your caring heart.  
There is one thing that separates the above story from becoming a reality: you. Keep it that way, dear sisters. Your choices define the best you. Make choices that are full of hope, not hate.

Kate Stanton, Alpha Iota – University of Oklahoma
Director: Collegiate Programming 

Kate Stanton’s days (and most evenings) are filled serving the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center as Executive Director for Student Affairs and Associate Title IX Coordinator as well as teaching a leadership seminar on the University’s Norman Campus.

Currently serving the Fraternity as Director of Collegiate Programming working with member education and programming initiatives, Kate treasures creating solutions, thinking outside the box and bringing student voice into the conversation. Celebrating life, filling others’ buckets, traveling, and finding the best iced tea takes up the other seconds in Kate’s day. An initiate of Alpha Iota – Oklahoma, Kate will blow out 20 candles this month marking her 20th anniversary as a Delta Gamma.

Friday, September 25, 2015

Five Common Barriers to Speaking Up

Five common barriers to speaking up are:

  • Social Influence- You don’t see anyone doing anything about it, so you don’t intervene. The thought that if no one else is doing anything about it, it must not be a big deal.
  • Fear of Embarrassment- This is based on the reactions you believe you will get from intervening. A fear of embarrassing yourself or others because it’s not the cool or popular thing to do.
  •  Diffusion of Responsibility- You assume, or hope, someone else will do something.
  •  Fear of Retaliation- This includes the fear of lack of support from peers, superiors or others.
  • Pluralistic Ignorance- You perceive that you are the only one that views this as a problem when in reality, most people privately feel the same way you do.

Friday, September 11, 2015

What To Do When You Suspect Someone May Be at Risk for Suicide

As sisters, it’s our responsibility to support each other and encourage those in our lives who are facing such issues to seek the help they need. September’s Bronze, Pink, and YOU topic will focus on suicide prevention. Using the hashtag #LiveGOOD, this month we will share information regarding signs and symptoms of depression, addressing suicidal thoughts, and what to do when you’re concerned about someone in your life. Below you will find invaluable information regarding what to do when you suspect someone may be at risk for suicide from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. 

1. Take it Seriously
50% to 75% of all people who attempt suicide tell someone about their intention.
If someone you know shows the warning signs above, the time to act is now.
2. Ask Questions
Begin by telling the suicidal person you are concerned about them.
Tell them specifically what they have said or done that makes you feel concerned about suicide.
Don't be afraid to ask whether the person is considering suicide, and whether they have a particular plan or method in mind. These questions will not push them toward suicide if they were not considering it.
Ask if they are seeing a clinician or are taking medication so the treating person can be contacted.
Do not try to argue someone out of suicide. Instead, let them know that you care, that they are not alone and that they can get help. Avoid pleading and preaching to them with statements such as, “You have so much to live for,” or “Your suicide will hurt your family.”
3. Encourage Professional Help
Actively encourage the person to see a physician or mental health professional immediately.
People considering suicide often believe they cannot be helped. If you can, assist them to identify a professional and schedule an appointment. If they will let you, go to the appointment with them.
4. Take Action
If the person is threatening, talking about, or making specific plans for suicide, this is a crisis requiring immediate attention. Do not leave the person alone.
Remove any firearms, drugs, or sharp objects that could be used for suicide from the area.
Take the person to a walk-in clinic at a psychiatric hospital or a hospital emergency room.
If these options are not available, call 911 or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) for assistance.
5. Follow-Up on Treatment
Still skeptical that they can be helped, the suicidal person may need your support to continue with treatment after the first session.
If medication is prescribed, support the person to take it exactly as prescribed. Be aware of possible side effects, and notify the person who prescribed the medicine if the suicidal person seems to be getting worse, or resists taking the medicine. The doctor can often adjust the medications or dosage to work better for them.
Help the person understand that it may take time and persistence to find the right medication and the right therapist. Offer your encouragement and support throughout the process, until the suicidal crisis has passed.

This information was taken from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

Thursday, August 27, 2015

Delta Gamma President Shows #IAmASororityWoman Support

I am a leader. I am a business woman. I am a volunteer. I am a philanthropist. I am a
mother, daughter, sister, cousin, niece. I am a wife. I am an advisor, a mentor, a role-model. I am a friend and confidant. I am a traveler, sailor, skier, reader, writer. I'm a big picture thinker, a visionary. I look for solutions and possibilities. I believe in the power of women. I am all of this and so much more, and I am not alone. I am a Delta Gamma. #IAmASororityWoman

Stacia Rudge Skoog, Beta Zeta-Denison
International President
Delta Gamma

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Kappa Delta, Sigma Delta Tau, Lambda Theta Alpha, Zeta Tau Alpha Show #IAmASororityWoman Support

"Sorority membership has taught me that when women stand together and support one another, there is nothing we cannot accomplish. I am honored to lead an organization that is committed to building confidence in women and girls everywhere. I am a sorority woman because linking arms with sisters who share a vision and a creed makes me a better leader and a better woman as together we seek that which is honorable, beautiful and highest. #IAmASororityWoman”
Alison Jakes Argersinger
National President
Kappa Delta Sorority

I am so fortunate to have the opportunity to serve as National President of Sigma Delta Tau. I am the leader I am today because of the skills I learned through sorority life in college, the volunteer opportunities I was given on our National Council, and the countless women I have utilized as role models and mentors. I am truly honored to empower collegiate women today through scholarship, service, leadership and sisterhood.  #IAmASororityWoman #SDTEmpowers
Michelle Carlson 
National President
Sigma Delta Tau

#IAmASororityWoman because since becoming a Sister of Lambda Theta Alpha in 2004, I  have experienced how being part of a sorority empowers women to be resilient leaders, provide a platform to serve the greater community, and opens an extended family to rely on as we grow personally and professionally.  I recognize the benefits of being part of a sorority and I make sure that I seek out those benefits to its full advantage as I balance career and family while also facing challenges that affect me as a woman and Latina. Ultimately, my time as a sorority member is priceless because no matter how many volunteer hours or responsibilities I commit to my sorority - it still doesn’t compare to the opportunities, life lessons, and lifelong friends that I have received from it.  
Beatriz A. Barragan 
National President 
Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority, Inc.  

As a collegiate member of Zeta Tau Alpha, I learned our motto is “Seek the Noblest.” Noble wasn’t a word I used often as an 18-year-old, but my chapter’s dedication to our founding values helped me understand the importance of upholding our Fraternity’s honorable principles and values. They have become my guide for my roles as mother, volunteer and leader. I am proud to serve an organization of women who still strive every day to “Seek the Noblest.” #IAmASororityWoman
Carolyn Hof Carpenter
National President
Zeta Tau Alpha

Monday, August 24, 2015

Learn more about The Order of the Delta Gamma Rose

The Order of the Delta Gamma Rose - The Order of the Delta Gamma Rose is the highest award presented by the Fraternity, honoring alumnae who have made distinguished contributions to their nation and/or the world. Recipients are renowned in their chosen fields, and MUST have received (inter)national recognition because of their individual efforts and talents. Ann Glossup Bordelon, Alpha Omega-Arkansas, received the Order of the Delta Gamma Rose Award in 2015 as recognition for her unparalleled excellence in both the national and international business world, having reached the apex of an impressive career while being an immeasurable credit to our beloved Fraternity. Ann worked as senior vice president and chief financial officer for both Sam’s Club and Walmart Asia. She was a board member for Walmart Mexico and is the immediate past senior vice president of finance and strategy-U.S. Operations. Her success is underscored by her membership in the International Women’s Forum, as a member of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government’s Women’s Leadership Board, the Sam W. Walton College of Business Dean’s Executive Advisory Board and her work with the International Accounting Standards Board. Also, Ann always finds time for Delta Gamma, having served on our Foundation Board of Trustees with great devotion and applied acumen. Ann is truly a deserving recipient of the Order of the Delta Gamma Rose Award.

Do Ann’s successes and contributions sound like the actions of another alumna you know? Nominate her for the Rose Award! You can find Rose Award instructions here.

Learn more about the Shield Award

The Shield Award - The Shield Award recognizes alumnae who have achieved unique and noteworthy distinctions through leadership and verifiable accomplishments in their chosen fields of professional expertise. Dr. Karla Treckel Mugler, Gamma Epsilon-Kent State, received the Shield Award in 2015 in recognition of her leadership as a powerful force in higher education and an inspiration to thousands of students across the country. Karla views education as the key to helping prepare students for careers and further education, as well as a means to support their families and contribute to the world. She served as dean of University College for the
University of Akron and influenced women throughout Ohio as a leader in the Ohio Women’s Network. Karla’s brand of “Do Good” has led her to become a respected leader on transfer and veteran’s initiatives for the Ohio Board of Regents, as well as the Association of Deans and Directors of University Colleges. Karla’s distinguished career highlights her genuine ability to guide and mentor students in a university environment. We are so proud to call her “sister.”  

Do Karla’s successes and contributions sound like the actions of another alumna you know? Nominate her for the Shield Award! You can find Shield Award instructions here.

Learn more about the Loyalty Award

The Loyalty Award - The Loyalty Award recognizes alumnae who have continued to serve the Fraternity for at least 10 years following recognition with the Fraternity’s Cable Award. This alumna is a woman who exhibits extraordinary commitment and distinctive dedication to Delta Gamma. Paula Jean Ellwein, Alpha Lambda-Drake, received the Loyalty Award in 2015 recognizing her incredible, continued commitment to Delta Gamma following her receipt of Fraternity’s Cable Award in 1996. She subsequently served as a Council Appointed Coordinator for both Epsilon Mu-William and Mary and Eta Mu-Lake Forest. She also served as secretary for the Delta Gamma Society of Minnesota, president and director-at-large for the 125th Anniversary Committee for Lambda-Minnesota and as a member of the Awards Committee. Paula continues to “Do Good” whenever an opportunity presents itself – epitomizing what “loyalty” to Delta Gamma truly is.

Do Paula’s successes and contributions sound like the actions of another alumna you know? Nominate her for the Loyalty Award! You can find Loyalty Award instructions here.

Learn more about the Cable Award

The Cable Award - The Cable Award recognizes alumnae who, through years of serving Delta Gamma, have evidenced unusual loyalty and devotion far beyond normal alumnae participation. Elizabeth Blackburn Reece, Epsilon Gamma-Virginia, received the Cable Award in 2015 in recognition of her incredible leadership in the Northern Virginia alumnae chapter for more than 10 years. Elizabeth is best known for her cheerful, “Do Good” attitude and her commitment to furthering the chapter’s goals. Her alumnae activities included serving in many executive board roles, ranging from chapter president to vice president: membership, 2004 Convention publicity chairman and as the long-running chair of the chapter’s iconic, annual Holiday Cards for Foundations fundraiser. Elizabeth is also a recipient of the Katie Hale Award, which recognizes loyalty, friendship and devotion to the Northern Virginia alumnae chapter.

Do Elizabeth’s successes and contributions sound like the actions of another alumna you know? Nominate her for the Cable Award! You can find Cable Award instructions here.

Learn more about the Oxford Award

The Oxford Award - The Oxford Award recognizes alumnae who exemplify the Delta Gamma philosophy of community service through volunteer and philanthropic activities. Recipients bring a sense of pride to their alumnae groups through outstanding community efforts and involvement. Lucinda Rice-Petrie, Mu-Missouri, received the Oxford Award in 2015 in recognition of her lifetime commitment to “Doing Good” as a tireless volunteer and philanthropic powerhouse. Her leadership in the Greater Kansas City alumnae chapter’s fundraising projects, from the House Tour to the Poinsettia Sale and the Plant Sale, is legendary. Her outstanding commitment to the community garnered her recognition as the 2004 Historic Kansas City Volunteer Service Award recipient. She was also made the 2007 Honorary Member of the Kansas City Young Matrons for exceptional service, and has received numerous other accolades for her volunteer spirit. Lucinda has contributed mightily to her chapter of Initiation, serving on the House Corporation Board with distinction meriting her receipt of the Eurethe Grant Doane Alumnae Award from the Mu House Corporation in 2011. Lucinda makes all who know her proud to say, “Why, yes, she is a Delta Gamma – and she is my sister!”

Do Lucinda’s successes and contributions sound like the actions of another alumna you know? Nominate her for the Oxford Award! You can find Oxford Award instructions here.